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Periodontal Disease Prevention

June 9th 2020

Lubbock Periodontics

Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is caused when bacteria in plaque builds up between the gums and teeth. When the bacteria begin to grow, the gums surrounding the tooth can become inflamed.

If left untreated, this inflammation can cause the gums and supporting bone structure to deteriorate. This can lead to gum recession and even tooth loss. In addition, research has shown that gum disease may be associated with other diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease. 

Thankfully, periodontal disease can be prevented. Adding these habits to your daily routine can help.
  • Brush your teeth. Brushing after meals helps remove food debris and plaque trapped between your teeth and gums. Don’t forget to include your tongue, bacteria loves to hide there. 
  • Floss. Flossing at least once a day helps remove food particles and plaque between teeth and along the gum line that your toothbrush can’t quite reach. 
  • Swish with mouthwash. Using a mouthwash can help reduce plaque and can remove remaining food particles that brushing and flossing missed. 
  • Know your risk. Age, smoking, diet and genetics can all increase your risk for periodontal disease. If you are at increased risk, be sure to talk with your dental professional. 
  • See Dr. Lisa Wentz. Get an annual comprehensive periodontal evaluation Dr. Lisa Wentz at Lubbock Periodontics. She will look at your teeth, plaque level, gums, bite, bone structure and other risk factors for periodontal disease. 

Identifying symptoms of gum disease early is key to protecting your teeth and gums.


General Dentist or Periodontist?

May 15th 2020

Lubbock Periodontics
It's the age old question...Who should treat my periodontal disease: my general dentist or a periodontist?

While your general dentist will be happy to advise you on effective cleaning methods and treatment options. It's a Periodontists who is going to give you the best treatment when it comes to fighting periodontal disease.

Periodontists are dental e​xperts in treating periodontal disease. They receive up to three additional years of specialized training in periodontal disease treatment in both non-surgical treatments and periodontal plastic surgery procedures. Periodontists are also experts in replacing missing teeth with dental implants.

Instead of leaving your treatment to one dental professional, you should consider having both your general dentist and a periodontist be actively involved in the diagnosis and treatment of your periodontal disease. This team approach will help your general dentist and your periodontist collaborate to tailor a treatment plan that works best for your individual case.

Why seeking treatment from a periodontists, like Dr. Lisa Wentz, may be necessary:
  1. Moderate/advanced gum disease – This occurs when the gums are bleeding, swollen or red around most teeth and the jawbone has begun to recede.
  2. Localized gum recession – The infection which propagates moderate or advanced gum disease often begins in one area. Gum recession may also be caused due to over brushing with a hard bristle brush, or due to a tooth that is not positioned properly.
  3. Before crown lengthening – The periodontist may lengthen the crown of the tooth by removing surrounding soft tissue to provide more tooth exposure. 
  4. Ridge augmentation – This procedure, often called "recontouring" may be required to correct an uneven gum line. Before embarking on treatment, a periodontist needs to treat any bacterial infections and periodontitis.
There are several ways treatment from Lubbock Periodontics may be sought. In the course of a regular dental check-up, if your general dentist finds symptoms of gingivitis or rapidly progressing periodontal disease, a consultation with Dr. Lisa Wentz may be recommended. However, a referral is not necessary for a periodontal consultation.

If you experience any signs and symptoms, it is important that you schedule an appointment with Lubbock officewithout delay.


Am I at Risk for Periodontal Disease?

April 15th 2020

Lubbock Periodontics
The term "periodontics" refers to the dental specialty that pertains to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of periodontal disease that affects the gums and jawbone. The gum tissues serve to surround and support the teeth and the underlying jawbone anchors teeth firmly in place.

Periodontal disease is a progressive condition which begins with mild gum inflammation called gingivitis. Periodontal disease is typically signified by red, swollen, painful, or bleeding gums, but in some cases has no noticeable symptoms. Periodontal disease generally begins when the bacteria living in plaque cause an infection in the surrounding tissues of the teeth, causing them to become irritated and painful. Eventually, this infection will cause the jawbone to recede and the teeth to become loose.

The best way to prevent periodontal disease is to take good care of your teeth and gums at home. This includes brushing your teeth after every meal and before bedtime, flossing at least once each day, and seeing Dr. Lisa Wentz for regular exams twice a year.

Periodontal disease is often silent, meaning the signs and symptoms may not appear until an advanced stage of the disease. However, you should still be on the lookout for the signs and symptoms, which include:
  • Red, swollen or tender gums or other pain in your mouth 
  • Bleeding while brushing, flossing, or when eating certain foods 
  • Gums that are receding or pulling away from the teeth, causing the teeth to look longer than before 
  • Loose or separating teeth 
  • Pus between your gums and teeth 
  • Sores in your mouth 
  • Persistent bad breath 
  • A change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite 
  • A change in the fit of partial dentures
If you notice any of these symptoms, be sure to contact Lubbock Periodontics right away.

Can children be at risk for developing periodontal disease?
Periodontal disease is rarely found in children, and only sometimes found in adolescents. However, children should still learn the importance of keeping their teeth and gums healthy to prevent periodontal disease in the future. Children should brush their teeth twice a day and learn how to floss properly. As a parent, you should also be aware of the warning signs of periodontal disease, which include red, swollen, bleeding gums or bad breath that won’t go away. If your child develops any of these symptoms, tell your child’s dentist right away.


Cleanings and Prevention

March 13th 2020


At Wentz Periodontics, our goal is that you smile with confidence! We want to ensure you are living your best life, and showcasing the world your beautiful smile.

We believe that the best way to continue to have a healthy beautiful smile before and after your visit with us is preventative care. Having a preventive program is a cooperative effort by the patient, dentist, and dental staff to preserve the natural dentition and supporting structures by preventing the onset, progress, and recurrence of dental diseases and conditions.

Preventing dental disease starts at home with good oral hygiene and a balanced diet. It is continued in the dental office by the efforts of your dentist and dental hygienist to promote, restore, and maintain your oral health.

A good oral hygiene routine is simple to follow if you already know how to properly clean your teeth. A good effective oral hygiene routine involves, brushing your teeth, using mouthwash and flossing correctly. This also includes knowing when you should come into a dentist or periodontist office. Knowing when to aski questions regarding your health and scheduling a cleaning.

Prevention helps avoid serious and costly dental problems and is the key to having a healthy, confident, beautiful smile.


Gum Disease Awareness Month

February 19th 2020

gum disease awareness month


According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, half of adults age 30 and older suffer from some form of gum disease. Gum disease comes with silent symptoms that often are easy to overlook. February is National Gum Disease Awareness Month. An important reminder to ensure your gums are healthy and that we are taking the necessary precautions to ensure our gums are in the best health possible.

A periodontist is a dentist who specializes in the soft tissues of the mouth and the underlying jawbone which supports the teeth. A dentist must first graduate from an accredited dental school before undertaking an additional three years of study within a periodontology residency training program, in order to qualify as a periodontist.

So if your wondering, when you see a periodontist and how a periodontist can help your smile, consider if you have or are experiencing one of the following symptoms.

  • Red, swollen or tender gums or other pain in your mouth
  • Bleeding while brushing, flossing, or eating hard food
  • Gums that are receding or pulling away from the teeth, causing the teeth to look longer than before
  • Loose or separating teeth
  • Pus between your gums and teeth
  • Sores in your mouth
  • Persistent bad breath
  • A change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • A change in the fit of partial dentures

gum disease month


How Often Should I Floss?

January 27th 2020

flossing lubbock periodontics

We all know the importance of brushing our teeth, getting checkups and taking care of our gums, yet there is one thing most people lack in, flossing. It’s time for a new year, new habits and new resolutions. January is the perfect time to create new habits that are healthy and that your teeth will thank you for in the future.

According to the American Dental Association, “The American Dental Association recommends cleaning between your teeth daily with an interdental cleaner (like floss).” Cleaning between your teeth is essential for removing plaque, which can lead to tartar around your teeth or lead to bacteria that can cause tooth decay.

So how often should you floss? You should floss once a day, either in the morning or the evening. According to the Journal of Periodontology, “flossing first and then brushing is more effective at removing plaque between the teeth and at maintaining the concentration of fluoride on the tooth enamel.”

If flossing is not part of your routine, you may want to start flossing for a healthier smile. Cleaning the visible surface of your teeth is effective with brushing your teeth, but for the places in between your teeth and for the health of your gums, flossing an important step in your oral hygiene routine.


Is there a Link Between Heart Disease and Gum Disease?

December 11th 2019


Research studies have shown that there is a strong association between periodontal disease and other chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, pregnancy complications, and respiratory disease.

Periodontal disease is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gum tissue, periodontal infection below the gum line and a presence of disease-causing bacteria in the mouth. Halting the progression of periodontal disease and maintaining excellent standards of oral hygiene will not only reduce the risk of gum disease and bone loss but also reduce the chances of developing other serious illnesses.

There are several theories that explain the link between heart disease and periodontitis. One such theory is that the oral bacteria strains which exacerbate periodontal disease attach themselves to the coronary arteries when they enter the bloodstream. This, in turn, contributes to both blood clot formation and the narrowing of the coronary arteries, possibly leading to a heart attack.

A second possibility is that the inflammation caused by periodontal disease causes a significant plaque buildup. This can swell the arteries and worsen pre-existing heart conditions. An article published by the American Academy of Periodontology suggests that patients whose bodies react to periodontal bacteria have an increased risk of developing heart disease.

If you have any questions or would like to set up a consultation, request an appointment here.



Smoking and Gum Disease

November 12th 2019


Your smile is the extension of who you are, the first impression for mosts. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, half of the adults age 30 and older suffer from some form of gum disease. Gum disease comes with silent symptoms that often are easy to overlook.

It’s no secret the health benefits of quitting smoking and not smoking at all. Smoking increases an individual's risks of various types of cancer, such as cancer in our lungs, pancreas, stomach and anywhere else in our bodies. Smoking also can lead to respiratory diseases and other different health factors. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Cigarette smoking harms nearly every organ of the body, causes many diseases, and reduces the health of smokers in general.” It contributes to causing more than 480,000 deaths each year in the United States. This is nearly one in five deaths.

By quitting smoking, not only does your overall health can improve, your smile and gums benefit as well. Here are a few reasons why smoking impacts your gums, teeth and overall smile in a negative way.

  • Stained teeth and tongue
  • Slow healing after a tooth extraction or other surgery
  • Difficulties in correcting cosmetic dental problems 
  • Gum disease
  • Oral cancer

If you have any questions or would like to set up a consultation, request an appointment here.


3 Unusual Gum Disease Risk Factors

October 24th 2019

gum disease texas

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, half of adults age 30 and older suffer from some form of gum disease. That is 1 in 2 people suffer from gum disease. Gum disease comes with silent symptoms that often are easy to overlook. “The main cause of periodontal (gum) disease is plaque, but other factors affect the health of your gums,” according to the American Academy of Periodontology.

Gum diseases are caused by lack of oral hygiene, not flossing or brushing your teeth. However, there are other factors that may increase your risk of gum disease. Here are three unusual gum disease risk factors to look out for.

1. Stress
Stress can cause various health problems and one of those is gum disease. According to the American Academy of Periodontology, “research demonstrates that stress can make it more difficult for the body to fight off infection, including periodontal diseases.” Stress may cause gum disease to go away, once you have it.

2. Teeth Grinding
Grinding your teeth or clenching your teeth puts force on your gum tissues supporting your teeth and can cause gum disease to accelerate. Not to mention, the negative impacts this has your teeth itself and your jaw.

3. Medications
Different types of medications can cause various side effects to our oral health, such as a dry mouth and others. According to the American Academy of Periodontology, “some drugs, such as oral contraceptives, anti-depressants, and certain heart medicines, can affect your oral health.”


2 Common Questions for a Periodontist

September 19th 2019


A periodontist is a dentist who specializes in the soft tissues of the mouth and the underlying jawbone which supports the teeth. A dentist must first graduate from an accredited dental school before undertaking an additional three years of study within periodontology residency training program, in order to qualify as a periodontist.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, half of adults age 30 and older suffer from some form of gum disease. Gum disease comes with silent symptoms that often are easy to overlook.

Here are 2 common questions you may have for a Periodontist.

My gums bleed when I brush, what should I do?

The first stage of gum disease (also known as periodontal disease) is gingivitis. Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gum tissue caused by bacteria wherein the gingival tissue becomes red, swollen and forms blood blisters inside the pockets of gum tissue surrounding your teeth (periodontal pockets). When these blood blisters are disturbed by either brushing or flossing they break open and blood rises to the top of the gingiva where you can see it.

There are many reasons gums bleed. However, almost all these problems involve plaque or bacteria that mixes with food and settles around the gum line. In most cases, bleeding gums (whether because of poor oral hygiene or tooth positioning) are exacerbated by plaque.

If your gums are bleeding when you brush, you need to see a dentist. If you're cleaning your teeth thoroughly, brushing twice a day, flossing once a day, and using a mouth rinse, then your cleaning technique might be causing the bleeding, or you could have hardened plaque (calculus) on your teeth that should be cleaned out. Dr. Wentz will advise you about regular cleaning appointments and even special root-planing appointments that might be necessary to eliminate your bleeding gums.

How often should I brush and floss?

You should floss everyday and brush your teeth at least twice a day, every morning and before you go to bed. Brushing and flossing help control plaque and bacteria that causes dental disease. Establishing a healthy oral hygiene routine will help ensure your smile is always healthy and looking great.

Plaque is a film of food debris, bacteria, and saliva that sticks to the teeth and gums. The bacteria in plaque convert certain food particles into acids that cause tooth decay. Also, if plaque is not removed, it turns into calculus (tartar). If plaque and calculus are not removed, they begin to destroy the gums and bone, causing periodontal (gum) disease.

Plaque formation and growth is continuous and can only be controlled by regular brushing, flossing, and the use of other dental aids.

 If you have any questions, or would like to set up a consultation, request an appointment here.



Take a Smile Analysis

August 21st 2019



A smile says a lot about you and hiding your smile is not a way to go through life. Your smile affects your self-image, and can greatly influence the quality of your interactions with your friends, neighbors and any other individual. Many people hold back from laughing or smiling because they are uncomfortable about their appearance when they do.

We have designed a “Smile Analysis,” that will help you appraise your smile. Take the full analysis here:




The Correct Way to Floss

July 17th 2019


We all have gone to the dentist fearing a particular question, deciding whether to be honest or fib. “Have you been flossing?” We all know the importance of flossing and the health benefits flossing has on our gums, teeth and overall health.

Flossing is one of the best defenders against gum disease. Gum disease comes with various symptoms that are silent and difficult to notice at first. Our personal oral hygiene routine plays an important role in achieving a healthy smile, starting with out gums.

By flossing daily, we ensure that our teeth are as clean as possible (between teeth and under our gumline). Flossing disrupts plaque colonies from building up, preventing damage to the gums, teeth, and bone.

1. Take 12-16 inches (30-40cm) of dental floss and wrap it around your middle fingers, leaving about 2 inches (5cm) of floss between the hands.

2. Using your thumbs and forefingers to guide the floss, gently insert the floss between teeth using a sawing motion.

3. Curve the floss into a "C" shape around each tooth and under the gumline. Gently move the floss up and down, cleaning the side of each tooth.

Floss holders are recommended if you have difficulty using conventional floss. Learn more on how to take your personal home care to the next level.


3 Questions You may Have for Periodontist

June 12th 2019



At Lubbock Periodontics, we want to ensure you have plenty of healthy reasons to smile. We believe a smile is a universal language and that your smile affects your self-image, and can greatly influence the quality of your interactions with others. Many people hold back from laughing or smiling because they are uncomfortable about their appearance when they do.

If you’re wondering about your smile, gum disease or even have a question for a periodontist, here are a few answers to our most common questions.

Can children be at risk for developing periodontal disease?

Chronic gingivitis is common in children. This can cause gum tissue to swell, turn red and bleed easily. Aggressive periodontitis can affect older children such as teenagers, even young adults. Localized aggressive periodontitis can mainly affects the first molars. Children should still learn the importance of keeping their teeth and gums healthy to prevent periodontal disease in the future. Children should brush their teeth twice a day and learn how to floss properly- if children learn how to floss at an early age, they will be more likely to make it a lifetime habit. These two simple acts will help protect their teeth and gums from periodontal disease.

What are common signs and symptoms of periodontal disease?

Because gum disease symptoms are silent and go unnoticed until an advanced stage, it can be difficult for people to notice. However, you should still be on the lookout for the signs and symptoms, which include:

  • Red, swollen or tender gums or other pain in your mouth
  • Bleeding while brushing, flossing, or when eating certain foods
  • Gums that are receding or pulling away from the teeth, causing the teeth to look longer than before
Learn about more other symptoms in our previous blog post above.

What can I do at home to prevent periodontal disease?

The best way to prevent periodontal disease is to take good care of your teeth and gums at home. This includes brushing your teeth after every meal and before bedtime, flossing at least once each day, and seeing your dentist or periodontist for regular exams twice a year. Spending a few minutes a day on preventative measures may save you time and money of treating periodontal disease!


When Should I see a Periodontist?

May 15th 2019


You may have heard of gum disease, the importance of flossing and keeping your teeth healthy.
Gum disease (or periodontal disease) affects millions of people every year, it’s the leading cause of tooth loss among adults. Seeing a periodontist and recognizing the symptoms of gum disease can help your smile healthy.

A periodontist is a dentist who specializes in the soft tissues of the mouth and the underlying jawbone which supports the teeth. A dentist must first graduate from an accredited dental school before undertaking an additional three years of study within periodontology residency training program, in order to qualify as a periodontist.

So if your wondering, when you see a periodontist and how a periodontist can help your smile, consider if you have or are experiencing one of the following symptoms.

  • Red, swollen or tender gums or other pain in your mouth
  • Bleeding while brushing, flossing, or eating hard food
  • Gums that are receding or pulling away from the teeth, causing the teeth to look longer than before
  • Loose or separating teeth
  • Pus between your gums and teeth
  • Sores in your mouth
  • Persistent bad breath
  • A change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • A change in the fit of partial dentures

Because gum disease symptoms are silent and go unnoticed until an advanced stage, it can be difficult for people to notice. Millions of people don't know they have this serious infection that can lead to tooth loss if not treated. If you have any questions, or would like to set up a consultation, request an appointment here.


National Oral Cancer Month

April 17th 2019


April is National Oral Cancer Awareness Month! This month, the goal is to raise awareness on the importance of performing monthly self-exams and recognizing the signs of oral cancer. “According to MouthHealthy.org, the ADA’s consumer website, over 51,500 people are diagnosed with cancers of the mouth, throat, tonsils and tongue each year.”

Be sure you are checking for anything that looks and feels abnormal:

  • Any sore or ulceration that does not heal within 14 days.
  • Any abnormality that bleeds easily when touched.
  • A lump or hard spot in the tissue, usually border of the tongue.
  • A sore under a denture, which even after adjustment of the denture, that does not heal.
  • A lump or thickening that develops in the mouth.

“Historically, those at an especially high risk of developing oral cancer have been heavy drinkers and smokers older than age 50.”  If you notice any unusual changes to your gums or mouth, contact us. 


Gum Disease and Kids

March 25th 2019


Did you know periodontal disease can also affect children? According to AAP, aggressive periodontitis and generalized aggressive periodontitis are types of gum disease in children.

Types of Periodontal Disease in Children: 

Chronic gingivitis is common in children. This can cause gum tissue to swell, turn red and bleed easily. Aggressive periodontitis can affect older children such as teenagers, even young adults. Localized aggressive periodontitis can mainly affects the first molars.

Generalized aggressive periodontitis may begin around puberty and involve the entire mouth. Symptoms include the  inflammation of the gums and heavy accumulations of plaque. Eventually it can cause the teeth to become loose.

Overall puffiness in gums, bleeding and recession are all noticeable symptoms of gum disease. Some simple ways to avoid gum disease in children is to establish a oral hygiene routine that involves brushing and flossing every night. Schedule dental visits for periodontal check-ups, and regular cleanings. Checking your child's mouth, especially when they are young, can also help identify symptoms, before they get worse.



3 Things to Do if Your Gums are Bleeding

February 13th 2019


As your brushing your teeth you notice a bit of pink when you spit out toothpaste or while flossing. It may not seem like a big deal, however if your gums are bleeding constantly, do not ignore it. This can be a sign of periodontal disease.

Switching up your oral health routine can also contribute to slight bleeding. Here are three things you can do if your gums are bleeding.

  • Tools: You have begun flossing and brushing regularly, congratulations! However, if you are experiencing bleeding, take a second look at your tools such as your toothbrush. “Although it might seem that a toothbrush with medium or firm bristles cleans your teeth and gums more deeply or thoroughly, harder bristles usually just cause irritation – which can be why your gums are bleeding.”
  • Diet: “What you eat and when you eat it also plays a part in keeping your gums from bleeding. Foods that contain lots of sugar or simple carbohydrates increase your risk for tooth and gum problems, as sugar creates an ideal environment for plaque to form. Commit to a diet that is low in sugar and high in the necessary nutrients found in foods like vegetables.”
  • Mouthwash: Utilize mouthwash to wash away bacteria and plaque. There are various types of mouthwash, so be sure to use the appropriate one for your oral health needs. 


Healthy Tips for a New Year

January 4th 2019


It’s time for a new year, new habits and new resolutions. January is the perfect time to create new habits that are healthy and that your teeth will thank you for in the future.

1. Brush Enough: How long are we supposed to brush our teeth? The ADA recommends brushing for at least two minutes, twice daily. Need help discovering how long is 2 minutes? Try listening to short song, cue up a two-minute timer on your phone to give yourself the time you need to thoroughly clean your teeth.

2. Change Your Toothbrush: An easily avoidable habit we can change is to switch out our toothbrush every 3-4 months.

3. Floss! Floss! Floss! Flossing is obviously a huge health benefit most people overlook. Like brushing, flossing must be done properly so that, when you reach between teeth, you actually get to the germs that are stuck there. Keep in mind the floss should rub against the teeth in a motion that creates a forward or backward 'C' shape, wrapping the floss around each tooth.

4. Stop Snacking: Ideally, you want to avoid snacking. If snacking is a big issue, be sure to brush your teeth after  because it can allow food particles and sugar to remain on your teeth for too long, providing fuel for bacteria that feeds on it.


    Smile Bright in 2019

    December 19th 2018


    At Lubbock Periodontics, we want to ensure you have plenty of healthy reasons to smile. We believe a smile is a universal language and that your smile affects your self-image, and can greatly influence the quality of your interactions with others. Many people hold back from laughing or smiling because they are uncomfortable about their appearance when they do.

    Take a Smile Analysis and determine how you want to smile in the new year. The Smile Analysis will ask you to answer questions such as:

    • Do any of your teeth appear too small, short, large or long?
    • Do you have any gaps or spaces between your teeth?
    • Do you have any crowns or bridges that appear dark at edge of gums?
    • Are the edges of any teeth worn down, chipped or uneven?
    https://www.lubbockperiodontics.com/smile-analysis.php



    2 Types of Mouthwash for Healthier Gums

    November 27th 2018


    Bad breath can result from the foods we eat, forgetting to brush our teeth or more often, a sign of periodontal disease. If bad breath persist, you may definitely want to set up an appointment to check on your gums and oral health. Seeing a periodontist is the best way for your smile to remain healthy and/or prevent any diseases.

    There are different types of mouthwash that one can buy, each with a different function that can help keep your smile healthy. Here are 2 types of mouthwash for healthier gums.

    1. Fluoride Mouthwash:
    You’ve heard how fluoride helps your teeth. Well fluoride in mouthwashes, does just that and helps protect your teeth from cavities and tooth decay. Healthy teeth affects your gums and roots, which help prevent periodontal disease.

    2. Antiseptic Mouthwash:
    The most common type of mouthwash is antiseptic mouthwash, found in most households. You may probably have some in your bathroom cabinet. This type of mouthwash contains alcohol and used to eliminate bad breath and fight infections in your mouth. Along with brushing your teeth and flossing, all three work together to fight bad breath and bacteria, keeping your smile healthy.


    Halloween Reminders

    October 24th 2018



    Halloween means fun times for every one at any age, dressing up and an endless amount of free candy. With all the free sugary treats at work or at home, your taste buds will surely love the sugar, your teeth and gums – not so much.

    Halloween can be a fantastic opportunity to remind your kids or grandkids of essential oral health routines. Be sure not to skip out on these essential routines:

    • Brush Your Teeth Together: Make brushing your teeth a routine every morning and every night. Stick to the routine and ensure that you and your family keep a specific time for brushing your teeth; this will build a great daily habit. 
    • Flossing is Key: Flossing every day is even more important when you have braces. If you’re having trouble flossing, just use a floss threader with regular floss, or buy special stiff-tipped floss made for braces wearers. 
    • Use Mouthwash: Using mouthwash is so important to fight bacteria in the mouth. Mouthwash can easily remove food debris from areas that are difficult to reach with a toothbrush or floss. After brushing and flossing, you can swish it around your mouth for a minimum of 30 seconds. This will remove any lingering bacteria and will even help with inflammation of the gums.


    Oral Cancer Exam: Wentz Periodontics

    August 16th 2018



    According to research conducted by the American Cancer society, more than 30,000 cases of oral cancer are diagnosed each year. More than 7,000 of these cases result in the death of the patient. The good news is that oral cancer can easily be diagnosed with an annual oral cancer exam, and effectively treated when caught in its earliest stages.

    Oral cancer is a pathologic process which begins with an asymptomatic stage during which the usual cancer signs may not be readily noticeable. This makes the oral cancer examinations performed by the dentist critically important.

    This oral cancer type usually originates in lip and mouth tissues.

    There are many different places in the oral cavity and maxillofacial region in which oral cancers commonly occur, including:

    • Lips
    • Mouth
    • Tongue
    • Salivary Glands
    • Oropharyngeal Region (throat)
    • Gums
    • Face

    It is important to note that around 75 percent of oral cancers are linked with modifiable behaviors such as smoking, tobacco use and excessive alcohol consumption. 

    When oral cancer is diagnosed in its earliest stages, treatment is generally very effective. Any noticeable abnormalities in the tongue, gums, mouth or surrounding area should be evaluated by a health professional as quickly as possible.

    The following signs will be investigated during a routine oral cancer exam: 

    Red patches and sores – Red patches on the floor of the mouth, the front and sides of the tongue, white or pink patches which fail to heal and slow healing sores that bleed easily can be indicative of pathologic (cancerous) changes. 

    Leukoplakia – This is a hardened white or gray, slightly raised lesion that can appear anywhere inside the mouth. Leukoplakia can be cancerous, or may become cancerous if treatment is not sought. 

    Lumps – Soreness, lumps or the general thickening of tissue anywhere in the throat or mouth can signal pathological problems.

    Learn more about Oral Cancer and its treatments. 


    Gum Recession: Wentz Periodontics

    July 30th 2018



    Gingival recession (receding gums) refers to the progressive loss of gum tissue, which can eventually result in tooth root exposure if left untreated. Gum recession is most common in adults over the age of 40, but the process can begin in the teenage years.

    Gum recession can be difficult to self-diagnose in its earlier stages because the changes often occur asymptomatically and gradually. Regular dental check-ups will help to prevent gum recession and assess risk factors.

    The following symptoms may be indicative of gum recession:



    Every case of gum recession is slightly different, and therefore many treatments are available. The nature of the problem which caused the recession to begin with needs to be addressed first.

    If you have any questions or concerns about periodontal disease, periodontal treatments, or gum recession, please ask your dentist or contact us for a scheduled appointment. 


    When to see a Periodontist

    June 29th 2018



    Gum disease (or periodontal disease) affects millions of people every year, it’s the leading cause of tooth loss among adults. Seeing a periodontist and recognizing the symptoms of gum disease can help your smile healthy.

    Gum disease begins when bacteria gather along the gum line and between teeth, where it’s easy for them to hide. As these bacteria multiply, they emit toxins that cause the gums to pull away, or recede, from teeth, leaving more of the tooth exposed to plaque and tartar. Once the bacteria move below the gum line to the tooth root area, they can’t be removed with brushing and flossing alone. This is the advanced stage of gum disease when tooth loss can occur.

    Seeing a periodontist is the best way for your smile to remain healthy and/or prevent any diseases. As a practice, we are true believers that preventive care and education are the keys to optimal dental health. That's why we focus on thorough exams – checking the overall health of your teeth and gums, performing oral cancer exams, and taking x-rays when necessary.



    Signs of Gum Disease

    May 10th 2018




    People always tend to focus more on tooth health, overlooking gum health. Gum disease is often painless and goes unnoticed until one discovers they have gum disease. Gum diseases lead to serious consequences, including a common consequence, tooth loss in adults. Fortunately, there are several signs you can be on the lookout for prevention and early detection.





    “The American Dental Association (ADA) reports that you may still have gum disease even if you don't display any of these symptoms. To give yourself the best chance at fighting the disease, be aware of these common signs and keep up with your regular dental checkups, which are essential for prevention and early detection”

    Preventing advanced stages of gum disease, is simple by regularly brushing your teeth, flossing and visiting a periodontist.

    Check our website for a list of services we offer, to ensure you smile with confidence.




    4013 84th Street, Lubbock, TX 79423
    (806) 794-7223
    (806) 794-8365
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    4013 84th Street
    Lubbock, TX 79423
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